With over 750 employees, we are one of the Territory’s largest employers.

We offer a range of exciting career opportunities through our early career programs that cater for apprenticeships, traineeships, graduates and professionals, and positions through the whole of government Aboriginal Employment Program. Apprenticeships are available for school leavers through to mature age employees, via specialist training provider Group Training Northern Territory (GTNT).

We recruit apprentices, graduates and trainees to work with us in our Alice Springs, Darwin, Katherine and Tennant Creek facilities. We offer training and development programs to support our employees to grow their knowledge and skills.

We believe our workforce should mirror the community we serve so we can deliver on our purpose of making a difference to the life of Territorians therefore we support diversity in our workforce, see below for opportunities for working with us.

How to become an apprentice or trainee

GTNT recruits Power and Water apprentices and trainees from Darwin, Katherine, Alice Springs and Tennant Creek.

Our apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities are advertised by GTNT, and through our Facebook and LinkedIn social media channels.

Checkout the GTNT vacancies or contact GTNT on (08) 8980 0600.

The next apprentice intake will be in August 2024.

Contact GTNT

Water operations technician

Duration 59 seconds

They are responsible for operating, maintaining and monitoring water treatment and distribution systems. Their primary role is to help us provide clean, safe drinking water to communities, and treat wastewater and sewage effectively.

Key responsibilities may include:

Water treatment: Operating and monitoring water treatment facilities to ensure water is treated according to quality standards and regulatory requirements.

Distribution system maintenance: Inspecting, repairing and maintaining water distribution pipelines, pumps, valves and other equipment to make sure it is working correctly and to prevent leaks or contamination.

Wastewater treatment: Operating and maintaining wastewater treatment plants to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. This involves overseeing various treatment processes such as screening, sedimentation, biological treatment and disinfection to remove contaminants and pollutants.

Water quality monitoring: Conducting regular testing and analysis of water samples to monitor water quality parameters such as pH, turbidity, chlorine levels and bacterial contamination.

Emergency response: Responding to water emergencies such as leaks, mains breaks and contamination incidents, and taking appropriate actions to mitigate risks and restore services.

Regulatory compliance: Ensuring compliance with federal, state and local regulations related to water quality, safety and environmental protection.

Record-keeping and reporting: Maintaining accurate records of water quality data, maintenance activities and regulatory compliance reports.

Water operations technician traineeships

Throughout the two-year traineeship, your training will focus on achieving a NWP30219 Certificate III in Water Industry Operations. Through on-the-job training you’ll cover a broad range of essential topics, learning about water treatment processes, quality testing and distribution systems, along with maintenance, safety and compliance measures. Environmental awareness and emergency response training are also included. You’ll work under the supervision of experienced water operations technicians to gain practical experience and gradually assume greater responsibilities as you learn more.

Subjects to focus on

Science: Chemistry, biology and environmental science provide fundamental knowledge about water properties, treatment processes and environmental impacts.

Maths: Essential for performing calculations related to water treatment processes, such as dosing chemicals or measuring flow rates in distribution systems.

Physics: Understanding the principles of fluid dynamics, pressure and energy transfer helps explain how equipment such as pumps and valves work.

Line worker

Duration 1:04 minutes

They play a vital role in ensuring the reliable delivery of electricity to homes, businesses, and communities.

Their work requires technical expertise, physical strength, and a commitment to safety in often challenging and hazardous conditions.

Key responsibilities may include:

Installation: Installing overhead or underground electrical lines to distribute power from substations to homes, businesses and other facilities. This involves setting poles, running wires, and connecting transformers and other equipment.

Maintenance: Inspecting power lines, poles, transformers and other components to identify signs of wear, damage or malfunction. Routine maintenance tasks include replacing worn insulators, tightening connections, and clearing vegetation that could interfere with power lines.

Responding to outages: Assessing damage and identifying problems after storms, accidents or equipment failures, to restore power to affected areas as quickly as possible.

Repairs: Troubleshooting electrical systems to diagnose problems such as short circuits, overloads or faulty equipment. They use specialised tools and equipment to make repairs, replace damaged components, and restore power.

Working at heights: Climbing utility poles and high transmission towers, or using bucket trucks to access power lines, lineworkers adhere to strict safety procedures to prevent falls and other accidents.

Collaboration: Working with other utility workers, engineers and supervisors to coordinate work assignments, prioritise tasks, and ensure power infrastructure operates effectively and safely.

Line worker apprenticeship

During your 4-year apprenticeship you’ll develop expertise in tasks like installing, maintaining and inspecting poles, structures, and related hardware used on them. This will lead to a UET30621 Certificate III in ESI – Distribution Overhead.

You can expect to work in various outdoor settings and will need to adapt to different locations and weather conditions. It’s important to know Lineworkers need to scale ladders up to 17m high, and work from elevated work platforms up to 45m high.


Subjects to focus on

Maths: Sound basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division are required for tasks like measuring cable lengths, calculating quantities of materials needed, or determining costs.

Literacy: Competent language and writing skills are needed to understand documents such as safe-work method statements, wiring rules, standards and drawings, and to complete documentation requirements.

If you’ve already finished school, completing a UEE22011 Certificate II in Electrotechnology (Career Start) is a great introduction to the industry, and it’s a good idea to complete a CPCWHS1001 Prepare to work safely in the construction industry, also known in the Northern Territory as a White Card.

Electrical fitter mechanic

A smiling line worker apprentice wearing a Power and Water personal protective equipment.

More generally known as Electricians, they help maintain the reliability and safety of electrical systems.
They install, repair and maintain high-voltage equipment, find faults, conduct inspections and take preventive measures to ensure the reliability of the power grid.

Key responsibilities may include:

Installation: Installing various electrical systems, including wiring, switches, outlets, circuit breakers and lighting fixtures, according to electrical codes and blueprints.

Testing and troubleshooting: Conducting tests on electrical systems and components to make sure they are working correctly. When issues arise, they find and resolve the problem, which might be short circuits or faulty wiring.

Repair and maintenance: Performing repairs and routine maintenance on electrical systems equipment and machinery to keep them in good working condition. This may involve replacing defective components, inspecting connections, and performing preventative maintenance tasks.

Reading blueprints and technical diagrams: Interpreting electrical blueprints, schematics and technical diagrams to understand the layout and specifications of electrical systems, ensuring they are installed and maintained correctly.

Safety and compliance: Following strict safety standards and regulations to prevent accidents and ensure electrical systems operate safely. They use personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow procedures to minimise risks associated with working with electricity.

Teamwork and collaboration: Collaborating with engineers, architects and construction workers to coordinate electrical installations and resolve technical issues. Teamwork fosters a supportive environment where knowledge and expertise can be shared, leading to better problem-solving and innovation in the field.

Electrical apprenticeship

During your 4-year apprenticeship you will study a UEE30811 Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician. You’ll develop on-the-job skills and knowledge in how to select, set up and install, test, fault-find, repair and maintain electrical systems and equipment in buildings and industrial environments.

Our electrical fitter mechanics hold the same qualification as a household electrician, however they work on electrical machinery as well as wiring and installations.

Subjects to focus on

Maths: Algebra, trigonometry and basic calculus will help you analyse circuits, calculate electrical parameters, and troubleshoot malfunctions. Geometry also helps with layout and measurement tasks, and arithmetic for basic calculations.

Physics: Understanding the principles of classical physics, particularly electromagnetism and circuit theory, is important. This includes concepts such as voltage, current, resistance and power. Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws and the principles of electromagnetic induction help with analysing circuits and troubleshooting. Knowledge of mechanical physics, such as forces and motion, may be relevant for certain aspects of the work, such as understanding electrical machinery.

If you’ve already finished school, completing a UEE22011 Certificate II in Electrotechnology (Career Start) is a great introduction to the industry, and it’s a good idea to complete a CPCWHS1001 Prepare to work safely in the construction industry, also known in the Northern Territory as a White Card.

Underground cable jointer

A smiling underground cable jointer apprentice wearing a Power and Water personal protective equipment.

They are specialised tradespeople who work with underground electrical power cables. Their primary responsibility is to install, repair and maintain underground cables, ensuring the safe and reliable distribution of electricity.

Key responsibilities may include:

Installation: Installing new underground cables in trenches, connecting cables to substations, and installing joint boxes or terminations.

Jointing and Termination: Joining or splicing together sections of underground cables. This involves carefully connecting the conductors in the cables using specialised techniques and materials to ensure a secure and reliable connection.

They also install terminations, which are devices used to connect cables to electrical equipment such as transformers or switchgear.

Testing and Commissioning: Carrying out tests to verify the integrity and performance of connections. This may involve conducting insulation resistance tests, high-voltage tests, and other electrical measurements to ensure the cables are operating within safety standards

Maintenance and Repairs: Maintaining and repairing existing underground power cables. This includes identifying and locating faults or damage in the cables, excavating the area if necessary, and performing repairs or replacements to restore the integrity of the system.

Safety and Compliance: Following strict safety protocols to prevent accidents and ensure compliance with regulations and standards. They may work with high-voltage equipment and must take precautions to protect themselves and others from electrical hazards.

Underground cable jointer apprenticeship

During your 4-year apprenticeship your training will focus on achieving a UET30821 Certificate III in ESI – Distribution Underground. Through on-the-job training you'll acquire a diverse set of skills and expertise, including laying, installing, and maintaining both low- and high-voltage underground cables, along with the installation and upkeep of electrical equipment.

Underground cable jointers spend a significant amount of time in restricted spaces like trenches, pits, and tunnels. They also work in a high-risk environment, so a safety-first attitude is essential.

Subjects to focus on

Maths: Sound basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division are needed for tasks such as measuring cable lengths, calculating quantities of materials needed, or determining costs

Literacy: Competent language and writing skills are needed to understand documents such as safe-work method statements, wiring rules, standards and drawings, and to complete documentation requirements

If you’ve already finished school, completing a UEE22011 Certificate II in Electrotechnology (Career Start) is a great introduction to the industry, and it’s a good idea to complete a CPCWHS1001 Prepare to work safely in the construction industry, also know in the Northern Territory as a White Card.